Cockpit

March 11, 2009

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This was the annual meeting of the and most papperspysslet done. Although it is not really so large workload, it has been difficult to focus on construction. So far, of course mostly gone on routine but now that I approach the cockpit and the design of the forward deck requires little concentration again.

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Beginning

Run with the approach of the recent construction work except that I'm a little more accurate with the pass, it would now be naturally finished interior decks. So I dread all the edges so no end grain is visible, and try to keep the clean lines of the joints. Wallpaper planer is invaluable here ..

When everything is ready to sharpen my inclination before I continue - but leave the top at last.

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Support Lister

After the first fitting the pieces, it is time for the part where the rib should be. Here you have the possibility to control up pretty well so you get exactly the slope you want. I have a slight S-bend here, too, to harmonize with the railing. One can also make it slightly curved transverse, so as not to feel overly flat.

Then, simply glue the strips again, simple at first, harder closer to the edge. Prebend with the heat gun to make it easier to fit in without too much violence. Also, try to find strips that turar well as the surface becomes smoother and easier to sand inside corners without scratching the inclined pieces later.

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Halfway

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Vertical frame

When everything is ready, I measure out the cockpit hole, cutting this and dread the edge so that the boards get the right angle. Gradual slope at the front, more in the back and straighter between ..

Usually also double thickness front & rear to round the edge more and increase strength - lifting is often kayak here. More pictures and tips on the previous builds ..

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Double the

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The next step

Eventually you just have to cut down the boards to the appropriate height - about 20 mm at the rear, and up to 25-30 in the front. The actual rim & flange in carbon I do not until the deck is clear and has glass on both sides.

Have outlined the recess in the foredeck, but not felt quite satisfied, so on Monday I made a new variant that is slightly larger and touching the cockpit. I know that you should be wary of new ideas during the construction time but this one felt pretty good. So after a few cups of coffee and a couple of hours thinking I put the saw into the wood.

Has set back the cut-out frames and started with the first few bars and it'll probably be able to see ok anyway ..

Update Thursday morning .. Last night I glued there the last bars of the foredeck and after the obligatory coffee break, I managed a fast abrasion well.

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Beginning

I saved a piece of the origin of the tire to stay in shape and have a nice bend to start. More puzzles before the first bit is in place as it must be planed along well, but then it is easier. Measure carefully, working with the plane a little at a time and try to place frequently. Becomes too short, so save the next step. And cheating is not here, foredeck is the middle of the spotlight for all future paddling ..

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Halfway

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Squeeze firmly

The easiest way to put pressure on the joints are tape and a piece list - fast and good point pressure. And a decent masking tape is good enough - sufficiently rigid and strong, leaving no residue and is easy to tear off. Duct tape is too heavy job and tear the wood. Forget clamps or straps ..

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Fair ..

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.. And rough ground

I was a little unsure about the truth it would really be good or it would look a bit contrived to have or cup as close to the cockpit. But the end result feels ok. It starts invisibly in the cockpit, to be two weeks later in the foredeck and then fade down to the railing again. Unfortunately, it is difficult to photograph the carpet shell, the camera can not focus, but then when the epoxy is so visible it is probably better.

The next step is lowering the shutters, before it is fiberglass over it all ..

Update Friday night .. How can it be if you peeps a little closer. Approximately the same place as close-up above, after coarse grinding.

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Pretty ok eh ..?

/ Ulf

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18 Responses to "Cockpit"

  1. Jim writes:

    So nice to then finish lunch on the job of opening up such beautiful pictures and such fine woodworking!
    Symmetry of the veins and all. Beautiful craftsmanship.
    Greetings
    Jim S

  2. Piaf wrote:

    So amazingly beautiful it is! Are cruelly impressed.
    best regards Pia

  3. Erik Frantzen writes:

    Bedre can ikke done. Jeg er Fuld of beundring.
    Erik Frantzen

  4. Eric B wrote:

    Sure it looks very nice out - and where I have enough solution to my problems with sweaty feet. A clear competitor to the Thomasson / Nordic Kayaks Surfskihybrid ;-)

  5. Ulf wrote:

    It is not entirely comfortable putting the saw into the wood and remove half the foredeck, but fortunately it is possible to correct-ventilation is gone now ..
    / Ulf

  6. Eric B wrote:

    ... Sorry for the feet but great for the eye! It seems to be great for hand and paddle.

    Also see that you are finished with bow decoration (on the workbench in the last picture) ...

  7. Erik A says:

    I just have to ask how to get to the regular sections. Is it hand-sawn with japansåg? If you get into it with a jigsaw, I am deeply impressed. Nah, I'm precipitously impad regardless of processing method.

    Can not post images with higher resolution so that any error appear?

  8. Patric says:

    Also, as usual, precipitously impad!

    But also a little småimpad of you managed to collect almost how many Erik anywhere in your fan club, and when we lack well at least? :)

  9. Leif Karlsson writes:

    I follow with bated breath your last build. The result of each construction element are of the highest quality and I am quite convinced that it does not depend on luck! Perhaps you fix the pictures Photoshop to hide any mistakes = 0)
    The pictures and descriptions are good, concise, and I'm like all very impressed with what you show on your website! Good job!

    I agree its best to build a Njord (my second building). I have made luckförsänkningar using the instructions from your website. And then fit them into the tire was very tricky. Sawn too small a hole as I extended since. In the end, well-fit OK, but it felt a bit hard to get to it. Do you have any tricks or tips how to do this job the best way?

    Here a couple of kayak-photos: http://www.lk-panorama.com/35mm/gallery4.htm

    / Leif Karlsson

  10. Ulf wrote:

    For the most part, I use Japanese saw and make a rough cut and then polish the edge of the right angle with the rasp and sandpaper. Buy sandpaper to belt sanders that are a little firmer to grind with - you can run by hand without the block for smooth bends - first 40 and then 80 papers. Tend to be quite ok joints, at least on the outside - inside is not quite in the same class .. It's a bit difficult to get to better pictures for the camera would not focus on the carpet surface, but I'll make sure if I can not fix something then when the epoxy is on ..
    But there was an unusual amount of over-complicated issue this time - usually I'm just a normal psychopath picky ..

    But as far as cutting holes to luckförsänkningarna I have unfortunately no good patent. The first time I made ​​a rough cardboard template that worked like that, did poke a lot of splicing bits .. The second time I drove more by instinct and cut up a small hole, then I got cut and rasp / grind several times. Took more time but every player. Both first few times I painted the deck so it was really not that fussy but it feels a little worse now ..
    Otherwise, the biggest problem is that carbon fiber dirty wood around and you have to be very careful to clean after grinding, preferably compressed air or vacuum.

    Then in the case of Eric, I would just point out that there actually is an unusually good name, is called the self as other names such as ..

    / Ulf (Erik)

  11. Eric B wrote:

    ... Eric is apparently Sweden's most common first names, even if not everyone has that first name. Thought for a while that there would be enough "Eric B" to distinguish me from other Erik: s of websites and forums but have seen in several places that other "Eric B" has written things that I do not want to stand for ;-)

    But that number belongs to Ulf's Fanclub's understandable!

  12. Ulf wrote:

    In addition, Jackson's most common surname .. The advantage is well that you do not spell out the phone and get it (mostly) correctly spelled in the letters. And that is just right anonymously if you would do something stupid ..

    Eric A; got a close-up ..

    / Ulf

  13. Robert R. writes:

    Ulf, riiiiiiiiiiiktigt neat!
    It may look easy, but I know ...

    Speaking of Ulf's "Erik-fanclub" as is I am there ... in other names!

    / Rob

  14. Patric says:

    Toksnyggt!

  15. eriksjos writes:

    Görsketasnyggt think one busy for.
    You can not shock us and build something really ugly and sloppy? ;-)

  16. Ulf wrote:

    Thanks All! It is not really on the very difficult - practice makes perfect and it's mostly about spending some time. And time is unfortunately in short supply these days.
    But if you want to see something really ugly and sloppy, I can post some pictures of the cleaning of my apartment for example ..
    / Ulf

  17. Björn Thomasson writes:

    Ulf, if you feel an irresistible desire to meet Erik's wish list, you can borrow some pictures of my quick-and-dirty-building - provided that you do not tell whose they are!

    It's pretty challenging to paddle along with Ulf - I must always remember that my kayak is at least three kayak lengths away so as not to hit too hard by direct comparison (on the water tends to never be a problem - where do they occur where the boat length of any reason automatically ;-)

  18. Ulf wrote:

    Hmm .. might be a more child-friendly alternatives. Pictures from my apartment cleaning is probably a good powerful experience, type NSFW.
    / Ulf